Sign In

Not a Member? Sign up here its FREE                 Forgot password?

Featured Events

Featured VENUES

Foxtail Nightclub
Aura
Subrosa
Victory Nightclub
Dream Hotel Downtown
STK Midtown
Heart Nightclub
Holiday Inn
Watermark
Flash Factory
ST CLOUD ROOFTOP
VERBOTEN NY
Baroque Astoria
Melrose Ballroom
Beautique
Create Nightclub
Meridian 23
LiFE Nightclub
Foxtail Pool Club
Monarch at Marriot Hotel
VIP ROOM
W Boston Hotel
Haus NYC
Attic Rooftop Lounge

tore melons in the refrigerator

applec
Posted by
applec

Posted on Wednesday, March 30, 2016

It’s been said that finding a good melon is like falling in love. Sometimes you have to try a lot of them to find the right one.

Judy Rodgers in The Zuni Cafe Cookbook insists that the best melons are the ones with lots of netting and claims not to have picked a bad one since learning that. I always take a good sniff. The most amazing melons I’ve tasted were melons that I could smell before I could see them.

Choose a melon that’s heavy and relatively firm, but not-rock hard (except for honeydew melons.) Any mold by the stem end or mushy spots are indications of it being over-the-hill.

A simple melon dessert can be made by pouring sweet wine, such as Muscat or Sauternes, over slices of melon and berries and chilling them well. Store melons in the refrigerator.
Peaches, Elderberries, and Nectarines

The best peaches have a sweet, perfumed aroma if you sniff the stem end. Peaches need to be picked a day before ripening, then ripened off the tree. Or better yet, the same day. If they’re too green, they were picked too soon and will never taste good. Ditto for nectarines. Find fruits that are mostly red and blushing.
If faced with a bin of underripe fruits, find one that’s rather soft and smell it. If it smells good, chances are the rest will be too, once ripe.
bag of apricots

Neither of these fruits boast much aroma, but they make up for it with lots of flavor. Apricots should have an appealing blush and no green. Red-tinged apricots means they’ve received lots of sunlight and will likely be good. Apricots are best when they’re gushy-ripe. They should be very soft, like a water balloon. My favorite variety are the Royal and Blenheim apricots.

Most of the flavor in plums are in the skin, and they make the best jam, especially when mixed with raspberries. Santa Rosa and Elephant Heart plums are reliably good.

Baked apricots are a superb, easy dessert: simply halve ripe, but firm apricots, place face-down in a baking dish, pour in a wine glass of white wine (dry or sweet), and drizzle with a copious amount of honey (use more than you think, as apricots get quite tart when cooked.) You can add a split vanilla bean too. Bake until the apricots are tender and juicy.

Comments (0)


Post Your Comment


Would you like to comment?
Sign up for a free account, or sign in (if you're already a member)

Web Analytics